Tag Archives: tilt-horizontal

A Simple demo of the ProShow Layer Location

ProShow fails to report a layer’s actual position when that layer has been rotated on a rotation center located at other than layer center. This demo shows the use of FPVPs “Tools for ProShow” to calculate a layer’s actual or adjusted position. It also clearly demonstrates ProShow’s failure to properly report a layer’s actual position as described above.

A ProShow layer’s position is normally reported as the location of the layer’s center point. However, the location is incorrect for cases when the layer has been rotated on a point that is not the layer’s center. This has been the case since the Rotate Center function was introduced with ProShow version 4.

My Tools For ProShow is fully capable of calculating a layers true or adjusted position when it has been rotated on a rotation center.

You can view the short and simple demo here:
Demo Of ProShow Positioning “Glitch.”

Dale

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Advanced Outlines & Frames in ProShow

ProShow’s outlining features are quite underwhelming … having remained essentially unchanged since they were introduced sometime around 2006 or so. When they’ll get around to updating them is anyone’s guess. But, way over 10 years without any changes is surprising.

As implemented, ProShow’s outlines are often not narrow enough or not wide enough. The same goes for ProShow’s shadow feature. If you want or need something other than the woefully limited options ProShow provides, you are on your own. It helps to have a tool that does the math for you … making things considerably easier to accomplish.

Tools For ProShow  fits the bill in this case. It makes it easy to create layers that you can use for outlines or frames or shadows that would otherwise be extremely difficult or time-consuming to create correctly. This tutorial does not show the Tools for ProShow in action; only the resulting values for this tutorial exercise are provided.

This tutorial provides but one example of what can be done with ProShow’s feature set using what are effectively user created outlines. You can either use graphics (PSP/PSG) or PSP solid/gradient layers. Gold has a bit of a problem properly handling graphics with translucence (that is, opacity at other than 100%). Also, Gold has no blur capabilities. So, if you’re creating outlines/frames in Gold … you may find yourself adapting your graphics to account for Gold’s limitation.

You can view the tutorial on YouTube:
https://youtu.be/Dms9pZ1ksqk

-Dale

Tools For ProShow Update (v11.42c)

An updated version of my tools for proshow was released on 2 September 2017. There were 57 changes made since the last release. Photodex changed the way that zoom modifiers worked. So, the worksheet was updated accordingly.  A number of changes to the tools were related to zoom modifiers. Another change was the ability to add a set of 4 user defined layer aspects to the Layer information section. It’s sort of like a “favorites” addition.

So, I was busy there for awhile. Sorry … forgot to update this blog with that updated information.

FPVP Tools for ProShow

The tools have a number of minor revisions, bug fixes, and feature additions.

  • The previous release only provided for finding a layer’s side, corner, or center when rotated on Rotate. This release expands upon that. The ability to find the actual position of a layer that was rotated on a rotate center was added.
  • The rotation may now use Vertical tilt, Horizontal tilt, or Rotate.
  • The EQUAL SIZE CHANGES tool was completely revamped.
  • A 4th language option was added (“YOURS”). Now, you can translate the given text to whatever you want to change it to, if you so desire. The other language options are English, French, and Russian.
  • The method of selecting a language was made easier to use.
  • Changes to the worksheet were also made to better accommodate language changes (so the columns don’t get really wide).
  • A link to the tutorial is provided directly within the worksheet now too.

This set of tools provides unprecedented access to some of the power ProShow possesses but which is not apparent except to the more Expert users. These tools provide access to features even most ProShow experts do not have. ProShow is not likely to provide access to the features this set of tools provides any time soon. For instance, 1) ProShow does not give you any information as to how tall or wide a layer is (rotated or not). 2) If you want to crop your later to a specific aspect, you must do the math yourself before entering numbers to get the crop. 3) Rotate Center (a feature that ProShow has provided since the release of v4 over 4 years ago) is implemented in a limited fashion. The power of the rotate center is effectively limited to a layer’s corner or side.

If you want easy access to some of that power, these FPVP tools are the answer. They let you do things that would otherwise require modifiers. As noted previously, these tools can let you do things you thought impossible, very difficult, or labor intensive. They can save you a considerable amount of time and effort. In truth, these tools make the difficult extremely easier. I’ve been using variations of these tools for several years now. Now, that power is available to you as well.

Dale
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ProShow Rotations

INTRO. Understanding the Photodex rotation system is very useful. It means you can choose a rotation direction without a lot of trial and error. Earlier versions of ProShow have always included the Rotate function. It has always represented rotation around the Z-Axis, the one axis we could never use. Since ProShow is a two dimension (2D) program, Photodex had invent a way to simulate a three-dimension (3D) environment. Their answer to that challenge was Tilt, rotation simulation about the X (Tilt-Vertical) and Y (Tilt-Horizontal) axes.

3D Simulation. Tilt simulates a 3D environment by the clever manipulation of a layers’ two sets of outside edges (i.e., top and bottom sides and/or the  left and right sides). If the distance is increased between one side’s two opposing corners and decreased between the opposite sides two opposing corners, movement into and out of the screen is simulated (along the Z-axis). This size contrast of opposing layer sides tricks the brain into seeing a third dimension. That’s because the wider side “appears” closer than the narrower side.

ROTATION DIRECTION.  When it comes to determining the rotation direction about an axis, which direction is associated with positive or negative values (as represented in the associated rotation box for Tilt-Horizontal, Tilt-Vertical, or Rotate)?  The answer is fairly simple but requires a little explanation. To start with, a rotation around an axis is

  • Positive, if rotation is clockwise (to the right),
  • Negative, if rotation is counterclockwise (to the left; also known as anti-clockwise)

An easy way to remember it is to use the Left Hand rule. If you curl the fingers of your left hand and point the thumb pointing toward your face, you will note that the fingers curl in a clockwise direction.

DETERMINING ROTATION DIRECTION

All axes derive from a central point called the “origin.” All axes meet there. Let us assume that the thumb points along the axis in which you are interested. A positive axis direction for the

  • X axis is LEFT,
  • Y axis is UP, and
  • Z axis is OUT of the screen (directly toward you)

So, for positive rotation values, if you point your left thumb

  • UP, the curl of the fingers indicate that the layer will rotate to the left (Tilt-Horizontal)
  • LEFT, the curl of the fingers indicate that the layer will rotate down (Tilt-Vertical)
  • OUT (toward your face), the curl of the fingers indicate that the layer will rotate to the right (Rotate).

The following graphic might help:

ProShow Rotation Reference

TECHNICAL NOTE: Normally, a positive axis is to the right for X, up for Y, and OUT for Z. The representation of these axes might be a little different depending on your application. However, the relative orientation between each axis will remain the same. Photodex experienced a little faux pax that wasn’t discovered until it was too late to change. That’s why the X axis is giving clockwise (positive) rotations on a negative value axis. No big deal as long as things are consistent. But, still good to know.
TILT ORDER CONSIDERATION:

Here’s another helpful hint when dealing with rotations. If you want to know a layer’s correct orientation for a given set of rotations, consider each rotation type in the following order:

  1. Tilt-Horizontal
  2. Tilt-Vertical
  3. Rotate

Or the following order:

  1. Rotate
  2. Tilt-Vertical
  3. Tilt-Horizontal

Never start out with Tilt-Vertical … it will throw you off every time!

That’s it!

Dale Fenimore
© 2012 Fenimore’s PhotoVideo Productions LLC
121102-2000